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Author Topic: New composition by me, suggestions?  (Read 61546 times)
kuni
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« Reply #45 on: August 24, 2005, 05:18:46 AM »

Oh gosh, your piano music is a HUGE inspiration to me, NightShader.  I love how much emotion and expression you've gotten out of such a clean composition style.  Thank you for being generous enough to post the sheet music for Sad Mood.  Just staring at the notes and how they were formed led me to several revelations about why I struggle so much as a composer, almost instantaneously...it was bizarre.  You are doing so many things right.  I would say more, but the words aren't quite coming.  So, thank you. Smiley

As for your other work posted here, there's a relaxed, natural undertone to most of the songs, which really works for them.  Many composers seem to get tripped up on forcing a structure to their music rather than just let it flow; yours flows nicely, seems natural.

I look forward to seeing how your music will develop as time passes.  Definitely do NOT give up on this path, okay? Smiley
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« Reply #46 on: August 24, 2005, 09:23:50 PM »

Nightshader, how old are you? You seem young. Yes?

Kuni...I said it to Flibuste two months ago...

Try not to over-do it. How 'bout mixing that up with a little bit of constructive criticism?
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Melda
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« Reply #47 on: August 24, 2005, 11:35:20 PM »

Adam does have a point.

No composition is ever truly perfect -- there is always room for improvement (however, it can be unhealthy to revise ad infinitum, so stopping and saying 'right, this is finished now' is necessary at some point).

Compliments are nice to receive, but if people only hear good things, they will become complacent and never feel any urge to improve themselves, or challenge themselves.

Sure, compliments boost confidence and encourage people, but too much can be downright hazardous.

I haven't actually listened to the music in question (now that my Internet situation is sorted out I might make more of an effort), but I just felt the need to back Adam up and point this out.
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Tom Servo
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« Reply #48 on: August 25, 2005, 12:54:15 PM »

I agree ... whole-heartedly.  Now, not that this is in anyway detracting from NightShader's music, but have you guys read what you've posted?  I mean, really read them?  I read on one thread that someone "didn't want to live anymore" after hearing one of NightShader's tunes.

really?  not wanting to live?  really?  So you're saying that his music was so good that it made you not want to breathe again?  His music may have some merit, but hardly that much I assure you.  I also hear words like "brilliant", "amazing", and "genius" thrown around like jello in a cafeteria food fight.  

really?  The music may be good ... or even really well-done ... but be careful of using genius and brilliant and amazing ... or even comparing NightShader's music to Jason's ... we're talking about two completely different echelons and a vast difference in experience.

Take everything in context.  And be honest without being deconstructive.  And I'll throw my two cents in right now ... without regard to production quality:

Nightshader ... these are just my opinions and are meant to be nothing more than helpful ... if they help you great ... if not, then leave them and move on the next person.

The CONQUER mp3 you first posted on this thread:  pretty good.  It sounds like you are using the same progression over and over again ... which isn't a bad thing ... sounds like Am - F - Em - Dm - C -
F - E .... is that close?  It's a cool progression, but I was hoping for a bright spot of change somewhere ... kind of like a B section or bridge of a song.  Where we hit somewhere new and unexpected.  In a piece like this ... hitting a nice Bb major chord would add some brightness and some life to a melodic passage that arrives on F.  Also ... your use of percussion ... I love rhythm ... but someone once told me that percussion is only secondary rhythm .... what I mean is that if you are using percussion to "carry" the rhythmic ideas of a section, then it's NOT as effective as having parts of the orchestra grooving on something and having the percussion accentuate that and enhance that.  Keep in mind, this doesn't always work, but a good idea nonetheless I think.  I would've like to have heard some more woodwinds grooving on those rhythmic ideas the timpani, snare, and bass drum were doing towards the end.

SAD MOOD:  OK ... some of the same issues I had with Conquer ... you are using the same melody over and over again ... just orchestrated and arranged differently.  I like the melody, but I really wanted to hear it go somewhere else.  You know?  It's like saying the same sentence over and over again but with different inflection ... after a while ... no matter what the inflection it gets old.  So to keep it fresh and to keep your listener hooked, you need to develop it ... same with the chord progression from the last tune.  I think you have some decent ideas, you just need to really sit down and learn how to develop an idea as opposed to repeating it.  How do you learn how to develop?  Listen ... and sit down with a score.  Listen to Beethoven's symphonies ... listen to the opening theme in a movement, and then listen to the coda and hear what he does to change it .. it's amazing.  Listen to the way Bach takes a melody and plays around with it in major, minor, and on the I, the V, the IV, even the vi ... sounds great.  Listen and see how Schoenberg takes a melody and inverts it, uses it backwards, and upside down.  All kinds of tricks.  But also listen to how they keep it fresh.

MAJID FIGHT: this one was pretty good ... other than ripping off the Batman theme!!  Hahaha... but it's such a tasty theme ... you're in A minor (again!! ... just kidding) ... so the use of a melody like  A-B-C-F-E will always draw attention to itself as the Batman theme... thanks a ton Danny Elfman ... but that's the way it goes.  I think there' a lot more developing that you could do with this one as well.

OK ... I'll stop.  Smiley  But NightShader I think you should focus on being a great composer first ... don't worry about writing programmatic material.  All of your music seems to be a backdrop to some intangible that we can only imagine.  I'd like to see you study some great composers and be able to develop your thematic ideas.  Make sense?  Let your inspiration be writing a great piece of music and you'll be surprised what happens when you're not guided by a scene on film or an idea of a character.  Film music can afford to be a little more plain and redundant because it is not the main character in a film ... but you'll find that it's easier to create better sounding redundant music when you are fully aware of how to compose a great "stand-alone" piece of music.  Once you understand that, then dive in and rock the video game music's world.  But when I am sending out demos to get a film gig, then yes, it is all "film score-ish" material and is serving as a backdrop to some on-screen action.  But I also write music just to write music .. writing woodwind quintets, and brass ensembles ... arranging music for jazz bands and composing for wind ensembles.  So it's good, I think, to be doing both kinds of writing.

I hope this helps ... if not, then leave it and I'm sorry to have wasted your time.  Smiley   Just remember: development.  theme and variation.  Listen to Bach's Goldberg Variations .... it will blow your mind.

-jeff
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After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music." -Aldous Huxley
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NightShader
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« Reply #49 on: August 25, 2005, 05:45:29 PM »

Quote from: "Adam"
Nightshader, how old are you? You seem young. Yes?


I'm 21 years old.
I play piano for 15 years now.
I'm also graduated for music-college.

@Tom Servo
I'll specially make a classical approached song for you. Smiley
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iquid GameStudios (www.liquidgamestudios.com)
Pascal van Stekelenburg
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« Reply #50 on: August 25, 2005, 06:40:46 PM »

NightShader ... I'm touched ... just for me?  

 :cry:


But will changing genres all of a sudden bring out masterful touches in your work?  Those should be there all the time.  But I'm anxiuos to see!

 Cheesy

-jeff
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After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music." -Aldous Huxley
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« Reply #51 on: August 26, 2005, 01:04:44 AM »

Quote from: "NightShader"

@Tom Servo
I'll specially make a classical approached song for you. Smiley


Ok, Pascal, don't miss Jeff's point. His suggesting that you develop your ideas instead of run loops does NOT have anything to do with 'classical' music, as you put it. Development can be found in most styles of music. Thats what bridges, second verses, and final choruses are for in the 'neo-classical pop' style that you utilize.

Jeff's point was right on the money.

He and I both write pop and 'video game' music that has development. It has nothing to do with being 'classically' trained. If it did, then 'development' would be a characteristic of that style ONLY. Not the case. There are plenty of baroque and early baroque (post rennaissance) music that contains melodic and harmonic development. And I'm NOT talking about using secondary dominants to get to the V in the B section...I'm talking about something more carnal, more cerebral...creating variety by molding a simple idea.

You can come up with hours of material based upon a sequence of five notes. Not that I listen to or LIKE music as processed as that, but it's a good example of an extreme one can go to in order to create motion in their piece.

Jeff said to me, earlier today, (and I agree), that there are many musicians who have some theoretical knowledge and think that that is enough to compose 'game music'. Well, unfortunately, that may be the case at first. A musician may be able to pass off a chart or two, but the really successful composers are the ones who constantly study music and learn the CRAFT of composition. Now, if THIS is your definition of 'classical', then so be it. Learning how to compose is quite conservative. But shit, the composers who REALLY succeed in their kraft are the ones who have a huge bag of tricks to pull from.

In othewords, your music has to be, to some degree, challenging to listen to.

Even Jason, who doesn't have a 'traditional' degree in music has studied TONS of scores and material, gone to seminars, consulted with mentors, and listented to whatever he can get a hold of. Jason's always quite excited when he can get his hand on a new score.

Food for thought.

I want to challenge you a bit, because you are so ballsy to post your music often...you asked for it, brother.  :wink:
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Punisher_x
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« Reply #52 on: September 30, 2005, 10:53:01 PM »

I am very impressed with this and almost all your work. Good job top maks from me.
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